In Part 1 of this two part series Eradicating Mediocrity (Part 1) – What are you waiting for? we looked at stopping peddling the hamster wheel of mediocrity. However, the reality is that some folk will peddle that wheel indefinately. But at what cost?

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Eradicating Mediocrity (Part 2) – The REAL cost of doing nothing

In Part 1 of this two part series Eradicating Mediocrity (Part 1) – What are you waiting for? we looked at stopping peddling the hamster wheel of mediocrity. However, the reality is that some folk will peddle that wheel indefinitely.

But at what cost?

Many people see the cost of mediocrity as things being a bit less than ideal, not good quality, a touch on the boring side and so on. So many people do nothing about it. After all, doesn’t seem a very high cost does it?

“What’s the harm in that?” you may be wondering. Or maybe you are thinking “ah well, that’s just the way it is” (I would have that last phrase made illegal if I had my way!!)

But that is part of the problem.

The real danger of settling for mediocrity isn’t always recognised for how damaging it really is – which is why it is so widely settled for.

The danger of settling for mediocrity is serious.

It is like a cancer killing the joy and fulfilment that should be part of your business and work life. It destroys relationships and rips apart families. It robs people of living a life they love with a passion.

Mediocrity is a killer.

Now, maybe you think I am overstating the case or being a touch dramatic. But it’s scary how many people underestimate the damage settling for mediocrity is doing to every area of their life.

The cost of doing nothing to eradicate mediocrity is much higher than you think.

Take a minute to think about this:

  • If your business and work life feel mediocre or is delivering mediocre results, that is killing the quality of your life, your relationships, your lifestyle
  • If your important relationships are mediocre that is damaging you, your kids, your family life and your quality of life.
  • If your lifestyle is mediocre it’s like choosing not to live life.

The point I am making is this:

The cost of doing nothing about mediocrity is sacrificing really living the life your really want

Now, from where I am sitting that is a cost too high to pay.

So I think it is time for each and every one of us to step up and take a pledge – to eradicate mediocrity.

It’s time to take a long hard look at where we are settling for mediocrity in every area of our lives. To be honest about the damage it is really doing and what it is really costing us. And to commit to taking action to stop settling for less. Not just for our own sakes. But to be role models to our kids.

Let’s declare today the start of “Operation Eradicate Mediocrity”

What do you think? You up for it?

This is part 2 in a two part series. You can read part 1 here Eradicating Mediocrity (Part 1) – What are you waiting for?

Related posts:

Why You Should Break All The Rules

Have work life and business become a disease?

Download Your Free Transformation in Action Self-Assessment Workbook.

  • Thanks Elaine. Glad you enjoyed it. My husband and I have both been on a mission to eradicate mediocrity since we left the corporate world back in 2001. It has been an interesting journey – transitioning into careers we love, moving from the UK to Ireland to live, designing our ideal lifestyle and family life and so on.
    We have discovered it is an ongoing process to keep mediocrity at bay and this latest challenge with our sons health has deepened our resolve to keep on this path. Thanks for dropping by.

  • I’m curious Ali, what allowed you to emotionally move past mediocrity back in 2001? I’ve come to believe that all positive change occurs when we’re out of our comfort zone and only then. Did you find that to be true for you?

    Sometimes that comfort zone is tested by something outside of ourselves or we create it unconsciously. Hence we experience the pain of remaining the same.

    The course of escaping mediocrity could be very different for everyone however I’ve thought deeply about my own past experiences when I’ve created behavior change in my life. It wasn’t always by consciously holding myself to higher standards. It was a process of discovery, which is very different for everyone I’m sure 🙂

    In the wild I heard that when you have a predator prey scenario, 1 in 20 attempts leads to a capture of its prey. Most hunting doesn’t work. Most of the things YOU do won’t work.

    If you don’t make any attempts, what are you chances of survival. Doing anything is better than not doing nothing! I’d say start consciously today to hold ourselves to higher standards (Having a bigger vision for ourselves) and not wait for something outside of ourselves to encourage it.

    Thought provoking post 🙂

  • Tony, what allowed me to move past mediocrity in 2001 was that I got to the stage where taking the risk of stepping out in order to create a more fulfilling life and to claim my personal freedom back became, in my mindset, less than the risk of staying in the shackles of Corporate life so it became a no brainer.
    I realised I was living someone elses definition of success and actually I was miserable, unfulfilled and selling my soul and freedom in order to conform to conventional ideas of success. Once I had created my own success definition it bore no resemblance to the coprorate hamster wheel I was peddling. Now I live by my definition of success.
    I agree change happens when you step outside your comfort zone. The thing is that once you start living outside the comfort zone it becomes easier all the time because of the results it returns.
    Thanks for sharing your thoghts with us Tony.

  • Elaine Rogers

    Love this mini series Ali – it’s amazing the things that happen in our lives that inspire us to rethink our situation.

    I am so glad your son has come through the other side. I imagine he will forget about the experience long before you and your husband! But a great reminder to consistently look to be better, and to do better in life, and live life for the journey it is, and not as a dress rehearsal.

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  • Sharon Hearty

    Hi Ali, this is a lovely series of posts on something I am passionate about and I am certainly up to getting rid of the disease of mediocrity. I just feel we are surrounded by it everywhere. The majority of people we [most of us] know live a mediocre life and because the majority do we are surrounded by these like minds which is binding in itself to those of us who strive to break free from the shackles of it. It is often said that you become like those arround you and if you surround yourself with those you strive to be like then you can and will achieve great things. I sometimes feel that it is like pushing water up hill with others and they look at what we have done [similiar to you jumped off the tread mill etc] and just don’t understand and in fact actually question us!
    For me the challenge to eradicate the sea of mediocrity is HUGE. But never-the-less I am happy to be trying and changing life for the better for my family and I. I only just read your two posts and am so sorry to hear about your son and at the same time so delighted for your good fortune on his recovery – life is for the living and often we let life get in the way of living – so I understand where you started from in this series of posts, our gift is living and loving for the minute, the now and just being… I am sure you read ‘Way of the Peaceful Warrior’ I just finished it and it is a book I will read time and time again and when I read your story it touched a cord. Take care, Sharon

  • Sharon, your comment really touched me. I share your concern about the amount of people who settle for the epidemic of mediocrity. By doing so it is also passed on to the next generation.
    In relation to those who question and judge those of us who have rejected conforming to others ideas of success and are creating something different, I must admit it used to affect me. But now, several years into my own eradicating mediocrity journey, I no longer allow it to affect me. Doing so many years ago robbed me of a fulfilling life so I think it is important to find ways to protect ourselves from the dream snatchers!!!!
    Thanks for the book recommendation – I haven’t read it but it is now on my book list.

  • Sharon, your comment really touched me. I share your concern about the amount of people who settle for the epidemic of mediocrity. By doing so it is also passed on to the next generation.
    In relation to those who question and judge those of us who have rejected conforming to others ideas of success and are creating something different, I must admit it used to affect me. But now, several years into my own eradicating mediocrity journey, I no longer allow it to affect me. Doing so many years ago robbed me of a fulfilling life so I think it is important to find ways to protect ourselves from the dream snatchers!!!!
    Thanks for the book recommendation – I haven’t read it but it is now on my book list.

  • Ali,
    I’m in!!

    Here’s to eradicating mediocrity!

    And the best place to start…with ourselves. BE the example!!

  • Lance, delighted your in. Welcome to the gang.

  • Lisa Stevens

    Ali,
    Just stumbled in on your site. I will book mark this one. I am collecting evidence that I am not the crazy one to think there must be a more livable way to live than the 8 to 5 grind of mediocrity.

    I agree that the social and pychological cost of thumping along Monday through Friday, 8 to 5, is huge. Society tells us that it is the responsible thing to do, the moral thing to do – especially if you have children. Do that sure thing. Have that stable job with good benefits.

    That being said, I think a good many of us would do well to commit “lifestyle suicide” and start over. That’s a really scary thing to do financially but how else will we teach the next generation that you really can do work you love.

    I am glad you are here to help us along.

    Lisa Stevens

  • Lisa, I think the problem is that most people already have a definition of success drummed into them by parents, society, peers before they are adults and conform to that. I think young people should be taught to create their definition of success based on their core values as that is the key to a fulfilling life. Everyones definition of success is different. It is a goos starting point if you want to change career mediocrity or any other area of life.
    As I have already mentioned here, I made the leap back in 2001 when I left the Corporate hamster wheel after 14 years. That started with questioning “is this it” and then moved onto creating my own success definition and then looking for how to make that a reality.
    What I have learnt is that anything is possible and the rewards are high for those who step up and chose to find a way to eradicate mediocirty.
    Glad you found us and welcome to the eradicating mediocrity gang.

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  • You are not crazy and there absolutely is a way out of the grind you describe, Lisa. It’s a while since you posted your comment; hope you are working your way out of ‘it’

  • Hi Carole,
    I agree –  we can find a way to change our circumstances. And questioning the status quo is a healthy thing to do, as it highlights to us when we are settling for what we don’t want just because it is widely accepted as the “norm.”
    Thanks for dropping by and offering your support to Lisa.