Have you noticed how many people place great importance on the ability to multi task? It seems to me that it is viewed almost as a badge of honour to strive for and achieve. It seems to be viewed as the answer to the overload of tasks so many people seem to be trying to juggle. But here’s the thing: Multi tasking isn’t the most effective way to manage many tasks and can actually be counter productive

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3 Myths of Multitasking

Multi tasking MythsHave you noticed how many people place great importance on the ability to multitask?

It seems to me that it is viewed almost as a badge of honour to strive for and achieve. It seems to be viewed as the answer to the overload of tasks so many people seem to be trying to juggle.

But here’s the thing:

Multitasking isn’t the most effective way to manage many tasks and can actually be counter productive

3 Myths of Multitasking

Myth 1 – You get more done if you multi task. Not true. Your productivity actually reduces the more you multi task. You are also likely to make more mistakes. Tasks actually take longer when you are trying to complete them at the same time as other tasks.

Myth 2 – You will feel more in control of all your tasks and responsibilities. Not true. It actually increases stress levels. The more you are trying to do at any one time, the more your stress levels go up. Not good for your health. Also, it isn’t attractive to others if you are constantly a little cloud of stress hanging round them!

Myth 3 – You can get stuff done while being with other people. Not true. Multitasking detrimentally impacts relationships. One of the most important things our important relationships need from us is our time and undivided attention when we are with them. It sends a very negative message if we are spending time with people we are also juggling lots of other stuff too.

The Alternative to Multitasking

So, here’s the good news:

It is OK to stop multi tasking. There are far more effective ways to get things done.

Here are a few suggestions to play with:

  • Start singletasking and make it a priority and habit.
  • Organise your tasks for the day into priority order and give them time slots.
  • Focus on each task totally, giving you full attention until it is done.
  • Remove distractions and temptations before you start each task.

The alternatives to multitasking are much more enjoyable, effective and healthy. It will enhance your productivity levels and the quality of what you are going. All areas of your life and work will benefit. And most important of all, your relationships will benefit from it because you will be nurturing your connection with them better and you are protecting and enhancing that relationship.

Now that we have busted some myths surrounding multitasking, is it time for you to evaluate how you manage your daily tasks, both personal and professional?

Download a free self-assessment workbook and practical guide to get better results with any goal.

  • Good insights, Ali!

    Multi-tasking is a great way to avoid being really intimate with anything or anybody. Permanently busy and “on” we're never really there. It is so much more conducive to life if we just do one thing at a time.

  • So true Christine. Even if you forget all the productivty and quality benefits of stopping multi tasking, it is just a more fulfilling way to be, both professionally and personally.

  • Good insights, Ali!

    Multi-tasking is a great way to avoid being really intimate with anything or anybody. Permanently busy and “on” we're never really there. It is so much more conducive to life if we just do one thing at a time.

  • So true Christine. Even if you forget all the productivty and quality benefits of stopping multi tasking, it is just a more fulfilling way to be, both professionally and personally.

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  • Mark Cia

    Womans perspective is true on this subject as it speaks of family

  • Leanne@crestingthehill

    I’m learning that multi-tasking is not my best friend – I can do a couple of things at once, but the more balls I juggle, the more likely I am to drop one!

  • This topic is so important! Thank you for excellent advice.

  • Spot on. Less juggling = less balls dropped…..plus…..if you are doing the most important things first anything that does get dropped will never be top priorities

  • Delighted you found it useful.

  • SharonGreenthal

    I am making a deliberate effort in 2016 to stop multitasking. It’s not easy.

  • Wow, this is such good advice. Marking a task off a list is so much better than being halfway done with a lot of things. And it makes us feel better too. Thank you.

  • Elaine Ambrose

    Excellent advice. I start a dozen projects that never get done.

  • You are so right. Multitasking causes mistakes and half finished tasks.

  • 1010 Park Place

    While I have a tendency to multitask, I always do better when I follow one thing at a time to the end. Brenda

  • Yes, it can be a difficult habit to break. But the many benefits of shifting to a habit of single tasking make the hard work so worthwhile.

  • Thanks Barbara. Glad you found it useful.

  • Good to get into a habit of taking on less Elaine. More gets done in the end compared to when we take on too much.

  • Debi, once we get that it really helps with shifting to embracing simgle tasking.

  • It is great that you have that awareness Brenda. Awareness is a great catalyst for creating change and moving to the next level of progress.

  • Yes it does.